Canadian eHealth strategy?

A recent blog post by my friend Alan Brookstone:

http://blog.canadianemr.ca/canadianemr/2010/03/ehr-priority-for-us-government.html

asks the question that I have heard echoed by many people with whom I speak about the Canadian eHealth agenda – “How do we get Canada back on track?”  There appears to be growing consensus, particularly when watching events unfold south of the border, that Canada is stalled when it comes to eHealth.   I can almost sense the excitement in the US from my desk.   On the other hand, I  have to look hard to find anything about Canadian eHealth initiatives.

So, what do you think?  Do we need changes to the Canadian eHealth strategy?  If so, what do you think they should be?

Mike

One response to “Canadian eHealth strategy?

  1. I think that we absolutely need a change in ehealth strategy. I could probably write pages on this but I’ll keep this brief.

    Bottom line is that doing this right is the single most significant thing that can be done to save the healthcare ecosystem money and in doing so, help preserve publicly funded healthcare.

    I’m a family doctor and it’s amazing how much of my time is wasted inefficiently in administration. Having a universal ehealth solution with all data and all heathcare professionals/ institutions just a quick online tap, link or online search away would revolutionize my day and let me do what I do best, which is spending time with my patients.

    I believe this system needs to be built from the ground up as open-source as possible allowing anyone to contribute to the build of the system as long as they meet some government set standards of privacy, security, connectivity, data architecture, etc. All data should reside in a giant online cloud. Patients, providers, institutions, government should be custodians of relevant data and control who views what and when through privacy controls. EMRs as we know them today would cease to exist and be reinvented as portals to and from the digital cloud, serving up, retrieving data, and acting as an ‘operating system’ for doctors and patients. In this way we could make operability among systems irrelevant.

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